Annual COVID vaccine as proposed by FDA? “The cart before the horse,” says the doctor

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just proposed the treatment Vaccines against covid-19 just as many Americans get the annual flu shot, in order to protect people against mutations of the virus.

Not everyone is jumping up and down about this idea.

The proposal aims to simplify future vaccination efforts, and under this strategy, most adults and children would receive a vaccine once a year to protect against the mutant virus, the FDA said.

FDA TO PROPOSE ANNUAL COVID VACCINATIONS LIKE ANNUAL FLU VACCINATIONS FOR AMERICANS

Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine and practicing internist at NYU Langone Medical Center, as well as a Fox News contributor, told Fox News Digital Monday evening about the plan: “I think the risk-benefit favors continued consideration of COVID. Vaccination, especially in high-risk groups, but that has to be an individual discussion,” he said, referring to doctor-patient communication and decision-making.

A nurse administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a patient at a vaccination center in November 2021.

A nurse administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a patient at a vaccination center in November 2021.
(REUTERS / Stephane Mahe / File photo)

“They’re putting the cart before the horse,” he said of the agency’s new idea, “showing a tin ear to the public’s fatigue over COVID.”

While “the idea of ​​an annual COVID vaccine makes sense, they ignore that they don’t really have the vaccine for that yet,” he added.

“We need more work on a vaccine to cover all variants, or a nasal vaccine to prevent the spread.”

Dr. Siegel outlined five factors to consider under this new proposal.

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One: “The poor vaccine compliance they have now (only 40% of those over 65, a high-risk group) is a factor,” said Dr. Siegel.

Two: “There is the position of Paul Offit, MD, at Penn, who I have interviewed, that they are pursuing subvariants and that when they have a new vaccine to cover [them]a new subvariant emerges,” said Dr. Siegel.

“Of course, the vaccine still reduces severity well, but it’s not ideal,” he said.

A nurse gives a girl a dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a school's COVID-19 vaccine clinic.

A nurse gives a girl a dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a school’s COVID-19 vaccine clinic.
(Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Three: “We need more work on a vaccine to cover all variants, or a nasal vaccine to prevent the spread.”

Dr. Siegel added, “In the meantime, we need to target high-risk groups with the vaccine we have.”

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He also said: “Long-term COVID is a concern for all groups, but there comes a point where vaccine coverage is sufficient to reduce the risk. And immunity after infection (so-called natural immunity) also must be included.”

“Vaccination requires a conversation that starts with a patient’s concerns.”

Four: “Too much time in the last three years has been spent overlaying an official public health position on a resistant public, whether it’s in terms of lockdowns, masks, mandates, school closings” or more, he said.

“Now, there’s more pushback and resistance.”

Under a new FDA proposal, Americans would no longer have to keep track of how many shots they've received or how many months have passed since their last booster.

Under a new FDA proposal, Americans would no longer have to keep track of how many shots they’ve received or how many months have passed since their last booster.
(iStock)

Five: “Although these vaccines are generally very safe and still somewhat effective, much of the public is not convinced, and our leaders should take that into account as well.”

He added Dr. Siegel, “Vaccination requires a conversation that starts with a patient’s concerns.”

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He reiterated that he “strongly” believes that the risk-benefit favors continued vaccination against COVID, especially in high-risk groups” – but said that this needs to be a “one-on-one” discussion between doctor and patient .

Under the FDA’s new proposal, Americans would no longer have to keep track of how many shots they’ve received or how many months have passed since their last booster.

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In documents posted online, FDA scientists say many Americans now have “sufficient pre-existing immunity” against the coronavirus – by vaccination, infection or a combination of the two.

Fox News Digital’s Bradford Betz contributed reporting.

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